Sign in, say "hi", ... and be welcomed.

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby JoeF » Sat Jan 16, 2016 10:43 am

[url-http://nmp.jpl.nasa.gov/st8/tech_papers/2005%20IEEE%20Aerospace%20Conference%20_Big%20Sky_%20Paper-%20NGU%20ST8.pdf]Next Generation UltraFlex Solar Array for NASA’s New
Millennium Program Space Technology 8[/url]
Brian Spence, Steve White, Nick Wilder, Todd Gregory, Mark Douglas, Ron Takeda
AEC-Able Engineering, Goleta, CA
600 Pine Ave.
Goleta, CA 93117
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
JoeF
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 3092
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:41 pm

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby JoeF » Sat Jan 16, 2016 10:47 am

Deployable booms

Image

Teasing image set HERE
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
JoeF
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 3092
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:41 pm

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby JoeF » Sun Jan 31, 2016 9:41 am

This is from this morning waking notes concerning a favored direction for a hybrid inflated splint-enhanced spar for kites, hang gliders, and other structures. My note might involve some invention;if so, I give such to Public Domain with no attribution constraint; anyone may use or commercialize products using described arrangements without having to give any nod to me.

Spar notes: Bonded knobby applique (BKA) to compression element (CE); CE is set on the inside of the case; the knobiness is pointed toward the case; the bladder inflates and presses the BKACE against the case. The pressing of the knobs causes a station keeping between the case and the BKACE. That station keeping is key to get the most performance from the splinting arrangement. Still use web cables to wrap the CE to the full inflated spar. Notice that this arrangement does not require permanent attaching of CE to case; that is, the CE may be loose and separate from the case during tote or storage; notice that a BKACE may be used while changing from one case to another case; and such mobile BKACE may easily be replaced. And notice that several BKACE may easily be placed inside a give case; this facility might be used to explore position of BKACE on a given case; this facility might be used to have two or three or four or more BKACE in a spar. And consider BKACE that are not full-span in length, but shorter and placed for some strategic reasons, if needed. Notice that the loose BKACE method placed between the case and the bladder allows fitting in a spar configuration altered CE designs (material, mass, shape, rod or tubular, flat or oval, tapered shape, etc.). Notice that a key concern solved by the described arrangement has to do with the prevention of stations on the CE sliding away from stations on the case; the target: no slippage of matched stations. That is, the opposite is the poor performing simple slapping a CE to case; such over-simplified method lets matched stations slip away from each other; such slipping brings a weaker spar and allows distortions and buckling that otherwise could be prevented by the described arrangement. So, to get top value from the BKACE, let that BKACE be snugged station-wise by bladder pressing the BKACE against the case; the knobiness will act as grab-and-keep-station fingers.

"Knobiness" may be obtain for the CE by any handy methods known to those skilled in the art. Consider epoxy dabs set on the surface of CE. Consider epoxy wrap of a cord helically sparsely around CE. Consider epoxy glued beads of certain shape. Preserve the integrity of the CE by avoiding cutting the CE. Consider a long short-toothed multi-pronged comb to the CE. Consider Velcro parts. Etc. The tiny bumps or protrusions or teeth will bite into the case and snug positions.. Of course, if one did not want the facility of having the CE separate from the case, then one may choose to bond permanently the CE to the case; such looses easy changeouts, repairs, separate stowage.

Some of the targets here is yet the coilable BKACE, coilable or flat pack of case and bladder.
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
JoeF
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 3092
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:41 pm

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby JoeF » Mon Feb 01, 2016 9:10 pm

Now Monday morning's spar-note progress
for an alternative that was not expressed yesterday.

This new alternative: trinity of fabric tubes hold two BKACE each for a total of six for the spar. The three subassemblies are tied together; the tie grabs two BKACE where one is from one fabric tube and the other is from the neighbor fabric tube; the macro case formed may stay assemble from one flight session to the next. The bladder is kept inside the case; upon inflation of the bladder, the three fabric tubes get squeezed to thin to form the circumference of the spar. The fabric tubes allow changeouts of the BKACEs as needed for experiments or repair or advancing the performance of the spar. The BKACEs become foundations for attaching chord members.
The "trinity" may become four; the "six" may become 8.
Note: BKACEs in on e spar need not be identical; they may be of different materials, sizes, shapes;they may be tapered; they may have appliques that differ in order to serve attachment. The glider's other parts will build upon the foundation of the spar. The spar with bladder will be coilable to a coil diameter handy for public-city-bus travel.

Release the coiled assembly; attach other parts; sock-sail; zip center; rig; inflate spar's bladder; check pressure; pre-flight; hook-in; clear all safety points of the environment and self; hook-in check; hang check; wing run, micoHG, GS, HG, soar, eHG (if unit attached to harness). Land. Repeat or pack: deflate, de-rig, detach parts, coil spar, pack parts into harness, cinch. Return home. Some may morph wing into a bicycle; some may design and pack to a wearable system. Advance pos and neg g by choice of case and BKACEs and bladder materials. Pump solutions vary; some will aim to use glider parts for initial pump; some will use electric pump and have solar energy be converted by use of PV surfaces. Upon going to lower altitudes of significance, fresh pumping will be needed during flight; automatic pressure keeping will be part of the story for gliding that intends significant altitude changes during the flight. eHG will have power source that could drive inflation pump as well as propulsion assist. eHG battery packs will be chosen to fit niche flight purposes; some pilots will enjoy 100 ft AGL max while enjoying takeoffs and short glides and landings. Other eHG pilots will want e-help to 300 ft AGL; others may go for 1000 ft or more AGL; some may drop e-units for RC controlled glide back to base station of the unit for use by next pilot or repeat for oneself.

Drawing will arrive tomorrow or so.
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
JoeF
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 3092
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:41 pm

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby Bill Cummings » Tue Feb 02, 2016 9:25 am

"Drawing will arrive tomorrow or so."
--- :D :D :D
Bill Cummings
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 2650
Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2011 6:20 pm
Location: Las Cruces NM 88005 (Region 4)

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby JoeF » Tue Feb 02, 2016 11:30 am

TrinitySpar001.png
TrinitySpar001.png (33.05 KiB) Viewed 1798 times


TrinitySpar001b.png
TrinitySpar001b.png (50.94 KiB) Viewed 1798 times


TrinitySpar002.png
TrinitySpar002.png (37.13 KiB) Viewed 1798 times

TrinitySpar003.png
TrinitySpar003.png (12.16 KiB) Viewed 1798 times


TrinitySpar004a.png
TrinitySpar004a.png (26.03 KiB) Viewed 1798 times


The compression elements (CE) that are surfaced with an applique for purposes of biting the fabric tubes are then designated as BKACE (bonded knobby applique compression element).
The BKACE resist buckling of the macro spar; that is, resists "taco" folding. Exterior long cables connecting the BKACE to itself after going around the exterior of the inflated beam may be configured.
=============================================

The "bite" from BKACE comes from the design of the bonded knobby applique. The the BKA could be formed by using one of several options. Here are some options: beads of soft silicon bonded to the CE, cord with many knots tied in it and then bonded to the CE, cord wound helically about the CE, zipper half bonded to the CE, Velcro hook bonded to CE (try without the other Velcro loop part and see if bite is adequate, else bond the other Velcro part--the loop-- to the inside of the tubular fabric). One target is to be able to take BKACE out when wanted; the compression elements may stay in place during transport and storage; but one may want to insert a different BKACE.
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
JoeF
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 3092
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:41 pm

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby JoeF » Tue Feb 02, 2016 12:53 pm

Tuesday morning, Feb. 2, 2016, waking notes included a focus on a special construction method for triangle control frame downtubes or legs or queenposts or extra-tall kingposts in target busable HG or WR wings (wing-running wings).
Current Wills Wing's downtubes or control-frame legs act as canted queenposts. The sample specifications here show lengths just longer than the 5-ft pack target, and so such teases facing having beams longer, as well as perhaps achieving other assets, but staying within the 5-ft target (ARP is going for 2 m, if I recall; others 6 ft).

(Falcon 145/Alpha 180) 61-3/16
(Falcon 170) 64-9/16
(Alpha 210) 63-3/16
(Falcon 195) 65-3/16

So, consider two-part beams:
Resolution: have a downtube or leg or queenpost or kingpost be made of two parts that overlap in the center of the beam. The overlapping provides more material where buckling under compression is most likely to occur; such is an asset. Then consider having the two parts be with right-angle cross section in order to obtain two other assets: nesting of angled parts into one another during tote for lower tote volume, and nesting ease for the overlap; anti-shear surfacing of the the overlap part along with banding or clamping would finish the beam's overlap join. A set of two small bands firmed by a W-style levered cam might do the join; press on the middle of the W and the levered cam rotates to press the underside of a band to firmly join the two layers of beams that are overlapping to form the full macro beam. Other methods known in the arts may be used to firm the join while using low mass; tapered band wedges might be pulled over the overlap ends and cinched together to stay position. A tall kingpost or a set of kingposts over 5-ft long could be made from two parts that are 5-ft or less in length. Angle cross-section does not do as well for torqued beams compared to circular cross sectioned beams; if this matters, then have two parts where one part's OD (outside dimeter) fits inside the other's ID (inside diameter) in a manner that can be disassembled for transport; the two parts could even be tapered, as the central portion is where buckling may occur; the parts may be streamlined in themselves or a streamline wrap could be used.

Image
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
JoeF
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 3092
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:41 pm

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby JoeF » Tue Feb 02, 2016 9:54 pm

By evening today, another method seems to save one from weaving strings to capture two neighbor CEs. The following method of construction notches the tubular fabric runs and uses just one CE per join of adjacent fabric tubes. If the system can handle the notching (takes 50% of the edge of each long fabric tube (maybe a reinforcing tape could solve a stressing pattern, if needed, that slightly develops because of the notching and pressure from the cased inflated bladder.
TrinitySpaCastleHingeMethod2.png
TrinitySpaCastleHingeMethod2.png (25.38 KiB) Viewed 1795 times
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
JoeF
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 3092
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:41 pm

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby JoeF » Wed Feb 03, 2016 11:05 am

TrinityOneSparOption01b.png
TrinityOneSparOption01b.png (31.55 KiB) Viewed 1778 times



Morning waking notes of Feb. 3, 2016, on a further method for Trinity Spar seems to grab my emotions. This method was described a bit priorly, but today more. Herein is donated to public domain, as usual. The following method has some compromises that earn some merits. The following method might well be a winner for many niche uses; and the following method may be the most accessible. The compromises involve a choice to do some sewing, though gluing or melt welding (or other technical closing methods) may substitute, especially if the case is formed from two or three wraps of case material. Depending on COTS seamless tubular materials seems to be more expensive and with less options compared to making one's own seamed case.

Still, recall in all these methods recently: The compression elements (CE or CEs) are to relate with the case so that station matching maintains; that is, the CE is not to be simply left loose able to slip matching stations away from each other. I tend to avoid permanent bonding of CE to case, as I am favoring CE-changeout ease; such may allow using CE in different cases or different CEs in some given case. Station matching? Mark a point on a CE; place the CE to the case; mark a point on the case just where the mark on the CE exists; those two marks during operations are to stay married at the same geometric position; differently, slippage would have the two marks go away from each other; such slippage is to be avoided in order to maximum anti-buckling of the case.

:arrow: Now, more toward the present post's method for having a Trinity Spar. I'll label the following method: Trinity One Spar to respect that only one fabric tube is used while three CEs are used. Here goes: Have just one seamless or seamed macro fabric tube with a best-performing weave (or laminate shelling veneer, etc., instead of fabric or net). Then fit the CEs to the <b> inside</b> of the macro tube; to assure station keeping of the CEs relative to the case, I am favoring Velcro hook-and-loop; bond loop to CE; bond hook tape to case; peeling the case over itself releases the CE for changeouts when wanted. Insert the bladder to the interior of the case. Upon inflation of the bladder, the bladder presses on the CEs which in turn presses flat the the hook and loop of the Velcro system.

In some instances all three CEs may configured to be coiled while the CEs stay integrated with the macro case. Notice that coiling one CE is easier than coiling all three CEs at once. But if the entire macro case with CEs in place and bladder deflated in place can be coiled for effective tote, then so be it for such instance. Other instance are optional.

Another instance of build could invite removal of the CEs from the interior of the macro case and removal of the bladder from the interior of the macro case. In such instance, peel the case over itself to release the CEs from the hook-and-loop hold; an alternative release method could involve tensioning the particular CE case and then pulling a wedge boat that tails a polyethylene separating strip which prevents hooks grabbing the loops again; then flip the CE and pull the CE out from the interior of the macro case. Then the long CEs may be individually coiled and fixed in coil. Then the three coils may be tied together for tote. Depending on the diameter of the coil, a wing pilot might choose to "wear" the coils during travel on a bus or during a hike site. Similarly, the bladder could be "worn" about a pilot's legs or torso or neck or arm or integrated in a hat or sombrero.

Special note: CEs may be of several types. Some CE choices could be full span length. However, overlapping segments may be used. In the case of overlapping CE segments, there is an option direction of using 5 ft segments with an aim of not coiling for tote, but stacking/nesting CE segments during packed tote to stay within the 5-ft length constraint. Notice in the case of overlapping CE option, there is little need to specially join the segments; it could be sufficient simply to lay the segments side by side or direct overlap two running CEs; however, coupling by banding is to be explored for integrating the antibuckling of overlapped CE segments. The CEs form longerons for the Trinity One Spar. I will be exploring many choices of CE: wood, plastic, bamboo, fiberglass, carbon-fiber composites, steel thin-wall tubing, aluminum, .... Having 16' CE or 33' CE as one piece CE has challenges and merits that invite very careful choosing. Cross section of CEs may vary from circular, rectangular, box tube, round tube, angle, triangle open, triangle closed, circular segment, ellipsoidal, ... One personal aim is to cut up the wood I have in my yard and see how much play for CEs may be had from such gleanings.

Why overlap when segmented-CE format is chosen? Such overlaps keep there from being a buckling point in the inflated spar. An option to overlap is the use of couplings that maintain antibuckle for the CE run; such method is used in tenting, pole extending, etc. Notice that the Velcro system means that couplers for CE segments may remain simple. Continuous antibuckling is the target.

Note: Recall to consider using exterior-of-case cabling of the CEs as part of the splinting method.
Note: See that the recent notes are not rehearsing the options of multiple bladder and interior-of-case web walls; such hybrid formats are available to the wing-spar builder for inflated spars. E.g. a two-bladder interior could squeeze a fabric interior wall or a stiff coilable carbon-fiber veneer sheet, etc. Or a three-bladder, etc.; or a four-bladder with interior coilable veneers. Cost, enjoyments, and performance comparisons will decide which hybrid spar one might build, test, or use. A first level is without the interior complexities.

Notice that the Trinity One Spar could tease using two runs of CEs side-by-side at one of three regions of laying CEs. Such could beef up directional antibuckling, say for positive lift loading in a wing. Note that many smaller CEs could bundle at one of the three CE positions.

Trinity One Spar case-material choices
Biaxial or triaxial weaves? Net or dense fabric? Fabric or film? Sheet? Combinations? I will be exploring many different choices. Since bladders will be pressing against the case, a net mesh too large could cause challenges of wear on the bladder and perhaps early buckling. Combinations of nets and coilable sheet will be explored. Just what might be optimal for a given purpose will ever be a question. Try, observe, test to destruction, report ... Much fun remains. Choices for the case will face seamless or seamed matters. A COTS seamless tubular film or fabric will save the need to form the tube form by sewing, welding, gluing, bonding, clipping, catching, ...

One case.
Three regions of CEA.
One bladder

==== See text for many optional variations of this general scheme for having a spar or beam.
Not shown are special cabling exterior to the case that enhance the effectiveness of CE in spar.
Valves and end-of-spar formats are not indicated.

==========================================
Optional detail images
TentStickCoupler.JPG
TentStickCoupler.JPG (10.68 KiB) Viewed 1778 times

TentStickCoupler2.JPG
TentStickCoupler2.JPG (18.41 KiB) Viewed 1778 times
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
JoeF
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 3092
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:41 pm

Re: The 5 ft-packed-HG Movement

Postby JoeF » Wed Feb 03, 2016 1:58 pm

The following article seems to have many points that have potential to affect the present topic:
Deployable Composite Booms for Various Gossamer Space Structures
Marco Straubel, Joachim Block, Michael Sinapius, and Christian Huhne
DLR - German Aerospace Center, 38108 Braunschweig, GERMANY
http://enu.kz/repository/2011/AIAA-2011-2023.pdf

==================================
Take a look at the graphic for a "rollable" carbon-fiber boom:
The rollable CFRP boom has been developed by DLR within the ESA funded solar sail study in the late
1990s.6 With respect to the above defined categories of deployable structures, the boom can be assigned a
member of the Elastically Deformed Systems.


The rollable boom depicted reminds me of Richard Miller's pointing to reefable spars for hang gliders; Richard spoke of such some 45 or so years ago. We mentioned such in Low & Slow , but we have yet to see any hang glider built with rollable or coilable spars. Our current era will, I predict, see some hang gliders with rollable/coilable spars.

I am not yet smooth about usage of the two terms "coilable" and "rollable." Careful distinction will probably bless the current project.
DeployableCompositeBoomsforVariousGossamerSpaceStructuresROLLABLEBOOM.JPG
DeployableCompositeBoomsforVariousGossamerSpaceStructuresROLLABLEBOOM.JPG (30.12 KiB) Viewed 1762 times
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
JoeF
User avatar
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 3092
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:41 pm

PreviousNext
Forum Statistics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 21 guests

Options

Return to Hang Gliding General