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Gliding's Nous Sphere

Postby JoeF » Fri Dec 20, 2019 10:09 am

Gliding's Nous Sphere
This topic is for exposing hang gliding's nous sphere. Have fun. Dig deep.
Find roots and developments. Meditate. Risk. Share.
=================================================================================
A first (until challenged) mention of a gliding nous sphere was in a post in the US Hawks forum topic started by Frank Colver about "remembering" others.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Let not the seed be left dormant. We herein may explore all knowledge to unwrap hang gliding's nous sphere.
What surfaces from our efforts may well enrich one's contemporary recreational hang gliding.
And the efforts may well help carve out hang gliding's future.
=================================================================================
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Re: Gliding's Nous Sphere

Postby Craig Muhonen » Fri Dec 20, 2019 10:44 am

"Let not the seed be left dormant".

A dormant seed comes to life with watering and mentorship.
I am remembering back to videos done about "Tiny Hawk", and Frank's training glider.
Let's feed and nurture those seeds, and "remember" the children.

Thank you Joe
"grow brave by reflection". And invincible with written words.
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Re: Gliding's Nous Sphere

Postby Free » Fri Dec 20, 2019 4:16 pm

JoeF wrote:Gliding's Nous Sphere
This topic is for exposing hang gliding's nous sphere. Have fun. Dig deep.
Find roots and developments. Meditate. Risk. Share.
=================================================================================
A first (until challenged) mention of a gliding nous sphere was in a post in the US Hawks forum topic started by Frank Colver about "remembering" others.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Let not the seed be left dormant. We herein may explore all knowledge to unwrap hang gliding's nous sphere.
What surfaces from our efforts may well enrich one's contemporary recreational hang gliding.
And the efforts may well help carve out hang gliding's future.
=================================================================================


I'm also a little confused about the full meaning of this.
I'm trying to plant seeds here.
Are you saying that, or am I still the villain of Thanksgiving dinner?
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Re: Gliding's Nous Sphere (HGNS)

Postby JoeF » Fri Dec 20, 2019 4:52 pm

This topic is for exposing hang gliding's nous sphere (HGNS).
===============================================
Moro's reflex


Consider thanksgiving for gravity and atmosphere and soil and sun. How human bodies respond to falling through air because of gravity.
The baby throws out its arms, maybe in a visceral wing forming upon sudden drop motions: "Oh! I do not want to fall fast downwardly!"
Could the acceleration of gravity be part of HGNS? Are we destined to grow wings for arresting falls? Could this response be a seed for gliding?
This seed about response to sudden sensing of the acceleration of gravity might be explored as part of HGNS.

The growing history of hang gliding might be seen as dew-giving cloud that can whet the coming future hang gliding activity. Such a cloud seems also to be an ingredient that forms HGNS. Seeding that cloud may bring rain to moisten the minds and hearts of a next generation of recreational hang glider pilots.
Join a National Hang Gliding Organization: US Hawks at ushawks.org

View pilots' hang gliding rating at: US Hang Gliding Rating System
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Re: Gliding's Nous Sphere

Postby Craig Muhonen » Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:19 pm

https://www.livescience.com/24071-ptero ... saurs.html

Lived from 220 to 66 million years ago, using his arms (they look very similar to ours) outstreached, defying gravity, but using his brain to climb high up, and soar,and topland.
Wasted energy to "flap wings".
66 million years ago, the small mammals had had enough, and called in artillery to take out the dinosaurs.
I guess humans figured out that wings were a nuisance, so they shed them for something they could put on top of their car.
The modern hang glider went from bamboo in 1970, to a full "Bob Hoover" type flex wing in 1979. 9 years ...wow. 1979 to 2019 ...how much better can they get? although you can't get much better than the "elagant" look of the glider and it's pilot. Maybe a hydrogen tube along the keel for Rick. Ha...
Next stop for humans is "boring" gravity manipulation. Watch The Fifth Element.

Abra Cadabra....... "I will create as I speak"

Thanks Joe, for "creating"
"grow brave by reflection". And invincible with written words.
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Re: Gliding's Nous Sphere

Postby Bob Kuczewski » Sat Dec 21, 2019 7:28 am

From https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nous:

wikipedia wrote:
Nous (UK: /naʊs/,[1] US: /nuːs/), sometimes equated to intellect or intelligence, is a term from classical philosophy for the faculty of the human mind necessary for understanding what is true or real. English words such as "understanding" are sometimes used, but three commonly used philosophical terms come directly from classical languages: νοῦς or νόος (from Ancient Greek),  intellēctus and intellegentia (from Latin). To describe the activity of this faculty, the word "intellection" is sometimes used in philosophical contexts, as well as the Greek words noēsis and noeîn (νόησις,νοεῖν). This activity is understood in a similar way (at least in some contexts) to the modern concept of intuition.

In philosophy, common English translations include "understanding" and "mind"; or sometimes "thought" or "reason" (in the sense of that which reasons, not the activity of reasoning). It is also often described as something equivalent to perception except that it works within the mind ("the mind's eye"). It has been suggested that the basic meaning is something like "awareness". In colloquial British English, nous also denotes "good sense", which is close to one everyday meaning it had in Ancient Greece.

In Aristotle's influential works, the term was carefully distinguished from sense perception, imagination, and reason, although these terms are closely inter-related. The term was apparently already singled out by earlier philosophers such as Parmenides, whose works are largely lost. In post-Aristotelian discussions, the exact boundaries between perception, understanding of perception, and reasoning have not always agreed with the definitions of Aristotle, even though his terminology remains influential.

In the Aristotelian scheme, nous is the basic understanding or awareness that allows human beings to think rationally. For Aristotle, this was distinct from the processing of sensory perception, including the use of imagination and memory, which other animals can do. This therefore connects discussion of nous to discussion of how the human mind sets definitions in a consistent and communicable way, and whether people must be born with some innate potential to understand the same universal categories in the same logical ways. Deriving from this it was also sometimes argued, especially in classical and medieval philosophy, that the individual nous must require help of a spiritual and divine type. By this type of account, it came to be argued that the human understanding (nous) somehow stems from this cosmic nous, which is however not just a recipient of order, but a creator of it. Such explanations were influential in the development of medieval accounts of God, the immortality of the soul, and even the motions of the stars, in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, amongst both eclectic philosophers and authors representing all the major faiths of their times.

Thanks for expanding my vocabulary Joe!   :salute:

Free wrote:... am I still the villain of Thanksgiving dinner?

That's completely under your control my friend.   :salute:

From Craig's link:
livescience.com wrote:
Flying_Dinosaurs.png
Flying_Dinosaurs.png (97.55 KiB) Viewed 1862 times

Pteranodons_in_Kansas.png
Pteranodons_in_Kansas.png (145.84 KiB) Viewed 1862 times

Pteranodons ... We're not in Kansas anymore.

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Re: Gliding's Nous Sphere

Postby Bill Cummings » Sat Dec 21, 2019 4:36 pm

Years ago someone told me of a pilot that went “over the falls, while exiting a thermal.
The pilot spread his legs with the idea that if he went completely inverted he had a better chance
of his rear flying wires keeping him from breaking his Aluminum tubes with his body.
From that time on it quickly became a muscle memory when I thought I might tumble.
For years I didn’t think about it until I put my first GoPro on my keel. While watching the videos
I saw, but didn’t recall it in flight, that I still do this when I think I could tumble.
Am I doing this thinking I learned this or is it a natural response to an impending fall?
I’m told we are born with some preprogrammed reflexes. Touch a new born’s cheek
and it will turn it’s head to get its mouth in the direction of the touch sensation.
Hold a several month old baby so that its shins touch the edge of a table and the
baby will lift both feet up and put them on top of the table.
If a newborn baby is fussing while you’re changing a diaper you can take both
hands in one of your hands then hold the baby’s hands against its chest and
PRESTO a calm baby. If a baby crawls to a situation it is unsure of it will read the
face of its mother for her expression to know whether to continue or not.
How much of this preprogramming do we go on to refine for use once
we are grown up? Can a child be exposed to the sensation of flying that will later
become a love for flight? Maybe it will instill a fear of falling.
During formative years children exposed to different things may find an interest
in something that can develop into a child prodigy.
If society deems an activity too dangerous have we arbitrarily thwarted the developing
child’s niche in an activity in which the child may have excelled? (Like hang gliding.)
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Re: Gliding's Nous Sphere

Postby Craig Muhonen » Sat Dec 21, 2019 5:36 pm

Excellent excellent point Bill. Time goes by so fast when our babys look us in the eyes, and by age four or so they're kinda on their own. Don't blink huh. Both my children were born and raised in Telluride and from a very early age I exposed them to "dangerous" stuff. It's kinda like you always have one foot in chaos and one foot in order by choice. They both were very independent growing up and when they told me that college wasn't their thing I asked watta you wanna do? One became a helicopter fire fighter, and search and rescue, the other a Blackhawk helicopter pilot. Guess 8,745 wasn't high enough for them.
If kids don't get a taste of chaos when they're young, they get stuck in order when they're old.
I think pilots like Greg Dewolf traveling across country flying their hang gliders, were like barn stormers and we need more of that because people (especially youngsters) really do yern for a bit of chaos in their life. My kids would ask "how do you do that?" And I'd say "come on... I'll show ya".
And I say yes to exposing a baby to free flight. I would hold my son with both my hands under each armpit, and toss them straight into the air and catch them just in time for their feet to touch the ground. Higher and higher each time, all the while they looked straight into my eyes, laughing . Kids need their parents to let them go, especially in water. A baby has an inate "swimming" ability, and will automatically hold his breath, and if they're not exposed to water and "air" at a young age, they may shy away from them for the rest of their lives.
Here is an experiment..... give a kid two kites...one shaped like a hang glider wing, the other one shaped like a collapsible parachute wing. Let him/her fly them for awhile in a good breeze, and ask "which one would you choose to fly for real when you grow up?" I think they will always choose the " wing" over the "bag of strings", because it looks like a wing. We gotta grab these kids young or they will choose "the bag of strings".

I thank you guys for US HAWKS, and I thank Joe for this fun fun topic.

Craig
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Re: Gliding's Nous Sphere

Postby Craig Muhonen » Sat Dec 21, 2019 7:33 pm

I guess Paul MacCreedy flew an early hang glider till his arm pits gave out.

Paul B. MacCready Jr. Born 11-29-1925. Died. 8-28-2007

He sure was (as Joe So aptly says) the "Dew in the Atmosphere"

Induction to the U.S. Soaring Hall of Fame, 1954[20]
Otto Lilienthal Medal of the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale, 1956 ("for his decisive victory in earning the title of World Soaring Champion in 1956")[21]
California Institute of Technology, Distinguished Alumni Award, 1978,[22]
Collier Trophy, 1979, by the National Aeronautics Association[23]
Reed Aeronautical Award, 1979, by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics ("the most notable achievement in the field of aeronautical science and engineering")[24]
Edward Longstreth Medal, 1979, by the Franklin Institute[25]
Engineer of the Century Gold Medal, 1980, by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers[8]
Spirit of St. Louis Medal, 1980[26]
Inventor of the Year Award, 1981, by the Association for the Advancement of Invention and Innovation[27]
Klemperer Award, 1981, Organisation Scientifique et Technique du Vol à Voile, Paderborn, Germany[28]
I.B. Laskowitz Award, 1981, New York Academy of Science[29]
The Lindbergh Award, 1982, by the Lindbergh Foundation ("to a person who contributes significantly to achieving a balance between technology and the environment")[30]
Golden Plate Award, 1982, of the American Academy of Achievement[31]
Gold Air Medal, of the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale[29]
Distinguished Service Award, of the Federal Aviation Administration[32]
Honorary Doctor of Science from Yale University, 1983[33]
Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Advance of Applied Meteorology, 1985, American Meteorological Society[34]
Public Service Grand Achievement Award, of NASA[29]
Frontiers of Science and Technology Award, 1986, first award in this category given by the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal[35]
The "Lipper Award", 1986, for outstanding contribution to creativity, by the O-M Association (Odyssey of the Mind)[36]
Guggenheim Medal, 1987, jointly by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers[37]
National Air and Space Museum Trophy for Current Achievement, 1988[38]
Enshrinement in The National Aviation Hall of Fame, July 1991, Dayton, Ohio[39] :ugeek:
SAE Edward N. Cole Award for Automotive Engineering Innovation, September 1991[40]
Scientist of the Year, 1992 ARCS (Achievement Rewards for College Scientists), San Diego Chapter[41]
Pioneer of Invention, 1992, United Inventors Association[29]
Chrysler Design Award for Innovation in Design, 1993[42]
Honorary Member designation, American Meteorological Society, 1995[43]
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Ralph Coats Roe Medal, November 1998[44]
Howard Hughes Memorial Award, Aero Club of Southern California, January 1999[45]
Calstart's 1998 Blue Sky Merit Award, February 1999[29]
1999 National Convention of the Soaring Society of America, dedicated to Paul MacCready, February 1999[46]
Special Achievement Award, Design News, March 1999[47]
Included in Time magazine's "The Century's Greatest Minds" (March 29, 1999) series "on the 100 most influential people of the century"[29]
Philip J. Klass Lifetime Achievement Aviation Week Laureate Award, April 1999[48]
Commemorated in Palau stamp, 1 of 16 "Environmental Heroes of the 20th Century", January 2000[49]
Institute for the Advancement of Engineering William B. Johnson Memorial Award, February 2000[29]
Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, National Design Award – Product Design, November 2000[29]
Hoyt Clarke Hottel Award, American Solar Energy Society, April 24, 2001 ("lifetime achievement as an inventor, specifically for inventing the world's first two solar-powered aircraft")[50]
2001 World Technology Award for Energy, England, July 2001[29]
Prince Alvaro de Orleans Borbon Fund, First Annual Award, October 2001, from the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale, Switzerland[29]
The 2002 Walker Prize, Museum of Science, Boston, March 2002[51]
International von Karman Wings Award, Aerospace Historical Society, May 2002[52]
The 9th Annual Heinz Award in Technology, the Economy and Employment, 2003[53]
Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science, 2003[54]
Honorary Doctorate, Washington & Jefferson College, May 2007[29]
Included in the Pantheon of Skeptics of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (Formerly Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal)(April 2011)[55]
Included in Flying magazine's list of the "51 Heroes of Aviation" (July 24, 2013)[56]
Inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame, 2015[57]

He's up there soaring with Greg and IZ
"grow brave by reflection". And invincible with written words.
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Re: Gliding's Nous Sphere (HGNS)

Postby Craig Muhonen » Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:16 am

JoeF wrote:This topic is for exposing hang gliding's nous sphere (HGNS).
===============================================
Moro's reflex


Consider thanksgiving for gravity and atmosphere and soil and sun. How human bodies respond to falling through air because of gravity.
The baby throws out its arms, maybe in a visceral wing forming upon sudden drop motions: "Oh! I do not want to fall fast downwardly!"
Could the acceleration of gravity be part of HGNS? Are we destined to grow wings for arresting falls? Could this response be a seed for gliding?
This seed about response to sudden sensing of the acceleration of gravity might be explored as part of HGNS.

The growing history of hang gliding might be seen as dew-giving cloud that can whet the coming future hang gliding activity. Such a cloud seems also to be an ingredient that forms HGNS. Seeding that cloud may bring rain to moisten the minds and hearts of a next generation of recreational hang glider pilots.


I thank you Joe for your heart felt words on the subject of "knowledge" being passed on to others, through "words". It may be the most important aspect .
"I create like the word" ......"abracadabra" ..... A 2000 year old "word" and concept that you and others at US HAWKS, have put forth , for ALL to see.
We look at butterflys, and birds, but you have given us again, a big magnifying glass.
I've been a plumber for 46 years of my life, and when you used the words "dew giving cloud", it struck home , in a "water" sense. To me, water is the "center" between the very big and the very small. It has the "memory" (information) and essence, that all things rely on for existence . "Plumbers Protect the Health of the Nation" is what the original union patches said, because we keep sewer water from drinking water, but that is the narrow concept. I like your much expanded concept of the "dew giving cloud", especially for younger pilots who are totally into "playfully, jumping and tumbling (sometimes) into the ionosphere.
Clouds and rivers and breaking waves, are what I call "ion chambers", because of that quality of the negative ions. I think that Frank would agree on the subject of "river ion chambers".
There is an inate quality of "flying like a bird" that draws people in towards hang gliders, and I think that US HAWKS through its "words" and actions, at its core, is providing the best "choice" for "wana be dew catchers".
That phrase "Dew Catchers" could be on T-shirts of all US HAWKS instructors, and when someone asks "what's a Dew Catcher?" , you can say "come on ...I'll snow ya".
Thanks again US HAWKS for your "inspiring" words, and commentary, on
Hang Gliders.... and their pilots. Ha.
"grow brave by reflection". And invincible with written words.
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